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Vijja Wichitwechkarn (Pat)

Joined BIST in 2006
2015: 3 As (AS Level) and 1 A* (A Level)
2014: 9 Grades A* and 1 Grade A (iGCSE)


What did you enjoy most about your school experience?
Events and the opportunities to contribute to them.

What are the most important things that BIST taught you?
Independence and self-reliance.

What advice would you offer to students sitting their iGCSE or A-Level Exams?
Do lots of past papers. Read more text books and ask teachers: keep asking and asking until the problem is solved.

Is there any advice you would give to current students, relating to academics or life at BIST in general?
Step up, don’t be shy. Be competitive, don’t be overly confident. Don’t be afraid to fail. Don’t be the “cool kids” who are too cool to participate and cooperate in events etc. When there are good opportunities, go for it , keep an open mind and learn – not just from classes but also your friends. The BIST Learner profile is brilliant. Observe your friends, and incorporate their good qualities into yourself and vice versa.

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Shubhansh Bharati (Meetu)
Joined BIST in 2013
2015: 9 Grades A* and 2 Grades A


What did you enjoy most about your school experience?
The atmosphere and cozy society while learning all the complex topics on a much deeper level.

What are the most important things that BIST taught you?
That you need a good blend of social and academic aspects of your life to get the most from school whilst also achieving your goals.

How did you prepare for IGCSE or A-Level exam?
I set up an Excel spreadsheet with each of my subject chapters, and divided it into the two months I had before the IGCSE exams. I knew I had to prioritise specific subjects and to completely polish others.

Is there any advice you would give to current students, relating to academics or life at BIST in general?
In the academic side of life, you need to improve your time management. It is a very crucial part of school and success. In terms of work-life balance, try to figure out where your passion lies, and don’t forget to have fun!

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Papawarin Pinij (Ply)
Joined BIST in 2007
2015: 9 Grades A*, 1 Grade A and 1 Grade B


What did you enjoy most about your school experience?
There are many opportunities to develop certain skills and enjoy new experiences, such as developing speaking skills in MUN, and collaboration skills via various team activities and interesting events to meet new friends and work with new people.

What are the most important things that BIST taught you?
Independence – being able to join committees without having to have friends join too, and to make new friends who are in different year groups. BIST definitely made me more confident and helped me develop many other useful social and educational activities.

How did you prepare for your IGCSE or A-Level exams?
I sought out past papers for every subjects and completed them. I would summarise chapters with drawings, using coloured papers for my notes. I tried to understand concepts, rather than just trying to remember everything.

Is there any advice you would give to current students, relating to academics or life at BIST in general?
Pay attention in class and ask questions if you do not understand anything. Don’t be afraid to put yourself up for everything (committees, house captain, etc.) Don’t just follow your friends, as that may shut down opportunities to make new friends and find what’s beneficial to you.

Vereka

Veleka Georgieva
Joined BIST in 2013
2015: 3 Grades A* (A Level)
Destination: BA Philosophy and Politics, University of Durham

What did you enjoy most about your time at BIST?
Life in boarding and having the opportunity to try out new things
2. What are the most important things that BIST taught you?
In BIST, I learned to be more open-minded and liberal. I also appreciated everything that my teachers have taught me in terms of skills, as I believe it will help me a lot in university.
What advantages has BIST boarding given you?
I think the best thing in boarding is the sense of community. I loved the opportunity to get to know the girls better and to communicate with people from different age groups.
How did the experiences or your time at BIST help shape you as a person, moving from being a student to a graduate of the University?
I feel that BIST has changed me so much as a person. I feel much more confident and self-reliant compared to when I first came to Thailand. I have made friends with many people from different countries, each of whom, I think, has taught me something. It’s really beyond words how much BIST has contributed to my personal growth.
Is there any advice you would give to current students, relating to academics or life at BIST in general?
I feel there are so many things that can be said here. However, the most important one, in my opinion, is to try out new things and to say yes to every opportunity that comes their way. BIST provides so many chances to give new things a go, so I think students shouldn’t stop themselves from having these fantastic experiences because of fear of the unknown. Despite exam stress and workload, time in BIST flies, and I think, if people view it as an adventure and an experience of a lifetime, they’ll truly make the most of it.


Henry

Henry Millard
Joined BIST in 2009
2015: 3A* and 7A

What is it you enjoy most about your school experience?
I enjoy the competition I have with classmates. In classes, I particularly enjoy debating and discussing the theory behind topics with my friends. I also really like that students and parents can interact with teachers without any boundaries.

What are the most important things that BIST has taught you?
Aside from Chemistry, Physics, Maths and Biology? Talking to my peers and superiors – about academic things, or about anything really. Asking questions; asking why. In a smaller school like BIST, talking to teachers becomes more personal and less formal, which makes talking to teachers and getting help easier, I feel.

Can you talk about your experience in preparation for the IGCSE or A-level exams?
I avoided going home before and during the exams. By the time I got home I would be tired and easily distracted, so I stayed at a small apartment in front of the golf course without internet so that I could study without distractions, and I would go to the school to study during the boarding prep sessions.

What advice can you give to current students?
Studying is important, but I think the more you do anything the more you’ll dislike it. Disliking your studies will make it harder to study, so make sure you have time off and have fun. Aside from that, some good advice is to get as much advice as possible. Preferably from people you respect personally. Also, sleep.